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PHCC and NCI Forge New Articulation Agreement

Patrick Henry Community College and New College Institute have forged an articulation agreement that makes it easier for students to transfer into local four-year university programs.

Dr. Kristen Westover, vice president of academic and student development, said the agreement is to ensure students a smooth transition from PHCC to Longwood University.

“We wanted to make sure we had the specific courses that would be transferable to Longwood within our General Studies degree specialization,” she said. “Many people collaborated on this including Pam (Randall) and Barbara Waldron, who helped with the groundwork.”

Dr. Greg Hodges, dean of academic success and college transfer, said when Longwood University partnered with NCI to start its teacher preparation programming, PHCC began offering the Teacher Education Preparation Specialization within the General Studies program.

“This was crafted to specifically address the requirements of Longwood’s program,” he said. “Because Longwood through New College is in our area, we wanted to ensure that we had something here for those students.”

Although this specialization is designed specifically for Longwood at NCI students, Hodges said many students still matriculate through PHCC’s General Studies degree program to transfer to other schools in order to finish their degrees.

Longwood Grads

Six Longwood University and New College Institute graduates recently gave presentations at the end of the fall 2013 semester on their capstone projects, which was a culmination of the Liberal Studies with Elementary Education Licensure program.
They include (from left) Jennifer Hairston, Kristin Moorefield, Nicole Powers, Sarah Reed, Megan Gregory and Justin McGhee. Pam Randall (far right) is the faculty and program coordinator at NCI.

Dr. Pam Randall, faculty and program coordinator at NCI, said PHCC is a great feeder to their bachelor’s degree program in Liberal Studies with Elementary Education Licensure.

“I only had three students this past semester that didn’t complete through PHCC … and those students come prepared,” she said. “Everyone has been so great working on this program. The education folks at Longwood were so gracious to meet with me and sit down to fold changes into their program.”

Randall said having a guaranteed articulation agreement tends to cut about a semester or semester and a half of coursework from a student’s schedule.

“It just streamlines the sequencing,” she said. “They’re not taking courses that we can’t accept or ones they don’t need, which may cause some students unnecessary time, money or efforts. If your goal is to get a teaching degree with Longwood, PH needs to know what we need and we need to know what PH will accept. It’s a great benefit for our students.”

What sets the Longwood University teaching preparation curriculum apart from others throughout the state are the requirements for classroom experience, Randall said.

“Longwood’s teacher prep program is highly rated statewide,” she said. “I think that’s because we expose students to the classroom every semester. We require them to be in the school and working with students. I can teach you how to teach out of a book, or by working with students. You can’t wait until someone has a license to put them into the classroom. You develop those skills along the way.”

The president of Longwood University, W. Taylor Reveley IV, made the articulation agreement official when he signed the contract last year on Dec. 18.

Dr. Leanna Blevins, associate director and chief academic officer of NCI, said this program continues to be one of NCI’s most popular with 26 students enrolled this fall and 23 enrolled this spring.

“Longwood University has an outstanding reputation for developing great teachers, and is a solid partner to NCI, to PHCC and to our K-12 partners,” she said. “Alumni from the Longwood program at NCI are embedded in many schools throughout our community, teaching with commitment, passion, and the solid education they received from both PHCC and Longwood at NCI.”

Six Longwood/NCI graduates recently gave presentations at the end of the fall 2013 semester on their capstone projects, which was a culmination of the Liberal Studies with Elementary Education Licensure program. All graduates were required to pass all their teaching exams and finish all student-teaching requirements.

Out of these students, four had already had job offers, accepted a job, or they were already employed, according to Randall. She added that all students were also PHCC graduates. They included Jennifer Hairston, Kristin Moorefield, Nicole Powers, Sarah Reed, Megan Gregory and Justin McGhee.